Student Life: The Ara Tramping Club

Being a student is about hard work, striving to attain your goals and being your best possible self. But all work and no fun is a sure fire way to burn yourself out…even the most conscientious student needs to take a little down time to recharge those batteries.

StudentsStudy
Hard work is good but the body also needs emotional nourishment…

To that end there are a number of different clubs at Ara which cater to different interests. From sports clubs, cultural clubs to groups for social get togethers there are groups for everyone.

One activity that is personally close to my heart is tramping. Tramping is the word we use in New Zealand to describe hiking/walking trips into the outdoors. A tramp could range from a couple of hours walking to monster 10+ day expeditions to remote Wilderness Areas. There is no better way to experience New Zealand’s legendary scenic delights that by walking there on your own two feet.

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Classic New Zealand tramping: sand beaches, swing-bridges and bush….
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…..and mountain and stream…

Here at Ara we actually have a student tramping club which caters to this interest. The Ara Tramping Club was set up in 2019 by a group of students and aims to assist both the novice and the experienced back country trekker to find experience and companionship while outdoors.

AraTramping
Article about the Ara Tramping Club in the Feb/Mar edition of Waha Korero

There is a long history of club tramping in this country and it is an excellent way to find people with a similar interest in the outdoors. It also allows you to access the skills and experience more seasoned trampers have and is the best way to begin your introduction to this most excellent pursuit.

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Photos of a 2019 Ara Tramping Club trip to Woolshed Creek, Mt Somers

There is a recent article in the Ara student magazine, Waha Korero (February/March 2020) about the Ara Tramping Club. It is well worth a read if you are looking to join a club to get outdoors. They are actively seeking members (both experienced and inexperienced) and would love to hear from you.

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Port William Hut, Rakuira, backcountry huts are the focus of tramping in New Zealand

 

You can contact the club via email at aratramping@gmail.com or on Facebook @AraTramping. The club also advertises their regular planning meetings around the Campus. If you are a student, love the forests and hills and want to experience the essence of New Zealand then you should drop them a line.

I hope to see many of you out in the backcountry…

….may your lunches be dry, your huts empty and your wood sheds full….

Reach your goals the SMART way

We all have goals – things we would like to achieve. As a tertiary student, it’s savvy to prioritise your goals.

You may have goals to:

  • Get higher grades in your assessments
  • Take a holiday after the exams

These are worthy goals – you’ll feel great when you make them happen. To reach your goals, you need to use a proven way to get started.

You need to set SMART goals to ensure that you get what you want. SMART typically stands for:

S: Specific

M: Measurable

A: Achievable

R: Relevant

T: Time-bound

Let’s take a look at 2 examples of SMART goals in action:

 

I want to score better grades

Specific:

I want to score an A- or higher in each of my courses.

Measurable:

Tomorrow at 2 pm, I will access the Ara Learning Services Exams and Tests resources

I will note down the advice given and take steps to study more effectively.

Achievable:

Tomorrow, after accessing the Exams and Tests resources, I’ll create a weekly time schedule. I’ll use the tips found in:

Organising Your Time

Organising Your Time handout

My schedule will show my class times, part-time work hours, self-study times, breaks and leisure times.

I’ll plan enough time each week to study each course.

I’ll consistently use improved learning strategies based on the Exams and Tests resources and:

How to Learn

How to learn handout

Relevant:

I have the potential to score better grades, as I have obtained good grades like B.

Excellent grades will jump-start my career when I graduate.

I’ll be more likely to get an attractive job offer sooner.

My self-confidence will increase.

Time-bound:

In the coming exams, I’ll be scoring more A- or higher grades in my courses.

In a year’s time, I’ll have more A- or better grades.

 

I want to save for my holiday

Specific: I’d like to save $200 for my holiday in Nelson.

Measurable:

I’ll take a close look at my finances tomorrow – my monthly income and expenses.

I’ll write down the ways I can reduce my spending.

I’ll think of new part-time work to look for.

Achievable:

Every Saturday I’ll record my savings, income and expenses.

Relevant:

I would like a Nelson holiday with friends during the summer break. It would be a reward for my hard work.

Time-bound:

I’ll have saved $200 in 6 weeks’ time (I’ve calculated that I can save $33.33 per week).

I’ll go on my Nelson holiday in mid-January 2020.

Saving money regularly is a great habit to develop. But are you doing everything you can to protect your money and financial information?

Use these 14 Ways to Protect Your Money and Financial information

These 2 examples above show that setting SMART goals makes them more than just wishes or dreams. SMART goals give you focus and clarity regarding:

  • What exactly is your goal? (Specific)
  • What exactly must you do, by what deadline? (Measurable & Achievable)
  • Why and how are your goals important to you? (Relevant)
  • When can you reasonably expect to reach your goals? (Time-bound)

 

How to stay the course and reach your SMART goals

How do you stay on track with the goals you’ve set? Some ways are:

  • Vision: Create a vision board or vision screen – look for attractive pictures, whether hard copy or online. Display in prominent places the pictures of your goals e.g. photos of the places where you plan to holiday. Make the pictures a part of your phone or computer home screen.
  • Reminders: Give yourself reminders – you can use phone apps or a digital/hard copy organiser.
  • Reward: Reward yourself for the milestones achieved, to sustain your momentum towards reaching your goals. Treat yourself to a special meal or a present.

Summary:

Step 1: Write your SMART goals.

Step 2: Keep yourself rewarded and motivated.

Step 3: Stay the course and walk the talk.

Step 4: Relish reaching your goals. Rejoice.

 

Start making and carrying out SMART goals to succeed. Check out these videos to find out more:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tBO_oqmEhGU

https://www.briantracy.com/blog/personal-success/smart-goals/

All the best and good luck!

Take action and make all your SMART goals come true

 

Leonard Yeo

Learning Services

Fantastic Friday

saying-1208974_1280Good news! From this Friday, 5th August, the City Campus library will be open until 8pm on Fridays. We’ve had a number of requests for this, and we’re happy we’re finally able to provide extended hours.

Student Assistants will be available after 5pm, to help with printing, copying, binding, access to computers, and all the library’s physical resources. You’ll also be able to borrow laptops and headphones to use in the library.

 

Access to the campus buildings is by swipe card only after 6pm on Fridays, so remember to bring your card.

You can find our full library hours here.

We look forward to seeing you on Friday – clear up all that study early, and enjoy your weekend!

 

You’ve got mail

Email has become so entrenched in our lives that it’s hard to remember a time without it. I remember when my family first had email at home, in the mid-nineties – it was amazing, even with really slow rural dial-up internet. That, and having hardly anyone to send messages to!

Email envelope

It is common now for a person to have up to six or seven email addresses for different purposes – one for work, one for family, one for shopping online, and so on. A change of job, a different internet provider, or a spate of spam messages will prompt a change of address. Apparently, over a third of people change their primary email address at least once a year.

As a means of communication between friends, email has been left behind by other social media. I can’t remember the last time I had an email from a friend, but the messages on facebook keep coming. Email, for me at least, is a more formal tool, suitable for more permanent communications.

All CPIT students are issued with CPIT email addresses, meant for these more permanent communications. The library sends its reminder and overdue notices there (you don’t want to miss those!), and most other official CPIT messages will also go to this address. So, if you haven’t already, it might be worth checking out your student email account – you can get to it from the campus life webpage:  

 student email link

If you need any help setting it up, we’re happy to help here in the library, any time. And remember – it could be the difference between fines and freedom!

Good karma

Students in library

In the library, we love the beginning of the year. After a couple of months of silence, the library comes alive again (sometimes a bit too alive, but that’s a topic for another day…)

Everyone’s still enthusiastic about their courses, assignments haven’t yet reared their ugly heads (much) and all is beer and skittles (or whatever it is the kids are saying these days).

The books are in high demand… Actually, that’s about where the love starts to wane.

I found a book yesterday that had 9 requests on it. Nine. We get books like this into the high use collection as soon as we can, but the wait, as I’m sure you know, can still be quite long – even for a three-day loan.

And now we get to the point: Managing your requests.

Once you’ve placed a request, keep an eye on it online, in the ‘My Account’ section of the Primo library search. If you decide you don’t need it anymore, cancel it – so that the next person in line can have a go.

Likewise, if you get an email saying the book is waiting for you, either come in and pick it up, or reply to the email to let us know you don’t need it anymore – so that the next person in line can have a go.

It’s about sharing, and treating others as you would like to be treated, and all that stuff you learned at kindergarten.

Children sharing a milkshake

Give it a go. Good karma.